Lower Turnbuckle Failure

Lower Turnbuckle Failure - click here to add to the discussion RE: Lower Turnbuckle Failure


From: Jeff McCord, Mischief Date: Mon, 16 Sept 2002
Subject: Lower Turnbuckle Failure

Mischief, our boat, lost it's rig a little over a month ago. So a little tip to all Soverel owners, check the turnbuckle that connects the jock strap (rod) to the keel.  That is what failed and caused not only the rig to come down but delaminated the deck ( more money to fix then a new mast!)

The following is picture of the turnbuckle. You may be able to see that it has rusted somewhat where cracks had developed over time. It was the one thing, unfortunately I did not replace when we reworked the boat 3 years ago. And being covered by the cushion you never really think to look at it closely. Well we paid the price, the insurance company now owns the boat.

Fractured Turnbuckle
click to expand image


From: Mark Yancey, Manhattan Magic Date: Mon, 16 Sept 2002
Subject: RE: Lower Turnbuckle Failure

Sparta (I think now called "Trust Me") had lost her mast due to the "jock strap" failing in a similar manner and caused a hole in the starboard side deck about 1 foot square. Any way SVM #24, ("Masquerade" when I owned her) is now a left coast boat in, I think, San Diego.


From: Dean Briggs, Stop Making Sense Date: Mon, 16 Sept 2002
Subject: RE: Lower Turnbuckle Failure

Q - jock strap - can you explain in more detail?  Is it the rod that connects the deck to the keel near the mast (ours does not have one) or are you talking about the rods that connect the chain plates to the settees (sp)?


From: Mark Yancey, Manhattan Magic Date: Mon, 16 Sept 2002
Subject: RE: Lower Turnbuckle Failure

On Masquerade the " jock strap" referred to by Jeff McCord was attached to the settee face originally but later modified to reach all the way to a full width plate under the mast step. Maybe he has a similar setup. It seemed to lend a little more rigidity to the whole system. The problem is that the turn buckle that is used to adjust tension to the Chainplate will trap water in the threads and rot them from the inside out, you don't know you have a problem until they fail. Like McCord said, check them!


From: Fred Creitz, Flim Flam Date: Mon, 16 Sept 2002
Subject: RE: Lower Turnbuckle Failure

I have been there and done that, I went to a swept back spreader rig and am happy not a soverel anymore.


From: Al Holt, x-Stalker Date: Tue, 17 Sept 2002
Subject: RE: Lower Turnbuckle Failure

We found problems with the tie rods (chain plates to settees) about three years ago. The rods were about to pull out of the aluminum pads under the deck (due to corrosion)and one of the turnbuckles had fractured. We replaced the entire assembly and added a strut between the chainplates (the "bar of doom" of Olson 30 fame) in order to stiffen the hull. Seems to help keep rig tension on our flexi-flyer and I sleep better.


From: Chris Merkle, Moisture Missile Date: Tue, 17 Sept 2002
Subject: RE: Lower Turnbuckle Failure

Can you send pictures of The Bar of Doom? I would like to stiffen our boat as well, but have no ideas of how to go about doing this process. Thanks.


From: Mark Yancey, Manhattan Magic Date: Tue, 17 Sept 2002
Subject: RE: Lower Turnbuckle Failure

Chris If you check the Sov33 site, go to "articles" then scroll down to " heavy air tourniquet" you'll see some pics of several stiffening tricks including the "bar of doom", a rod or tube that connects the port and starboardchain plates.

Bar of Doom
click to expand image
or click to go to Heavy Air Tourniquet.


From: Jeff McCord, Mischief Date: Tue, 17 Sept 2002
Subject: RE: Lower Turnbuckle Failure

It was the starboard turnbuckle that failed. Later we looked closely at the port turnbuckle and found cracks in that! My Advice replace both of them! Our estimate for repair was $27,000. Boat US totaled the boat but would like to sell it back to us for $15,000. So we now are looking for another Soverel or something a bit more sturdy for San Francisco Bay. I have talked to a few folks who say there is a product out there that can help detect cracks in cast parts. I can't recall the name but I am sure good rigger would know what it is called.


From: Ian Duff, Invisible Cities Date: Tue, 17 Sept 2002
Subject: RE: Lower Turnbuckle Failure

Any dye penetrant test will do it, although it's tough to get good results on anything threaded. Basic concept is wash the part to be tested with dye, and wipe it off. Any cracks will hold the dye. There are a couple of ways to detect the dye caught in the cracks. One is to sprinkle contrasting powder on the piece, and the dye seeps out and stains it, the other is to use dye that glows under correct lighting. Both work pretty well. I'm guessing the threaded part of my turnbuckles are at about the end of their useful life, and plan on replacing them over the winter. I've already done so on the headstay, with the long version to get more rake. The shroud turnbuckle bits remain to be replaced. That's my version of testing, at least for the present.

[Note some Dye Penatrants also use a "developer" which highlight the cracks. Other methods of non-destructive testing include x-rays and UT's (ultrasonic testing)]

Dye Penatrant Suppliers (examples):
Crack Check Dynaflux Inc. - Cartersville, Georgia 30120
Fault Finder Crown Industrial Products Corp. - 100 Stateline Rd, Heron IL 60034
Spot Checker Magnaflux, Div. of Illinois Tool Works - Glenview IL, 60025

 


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